QualityCourseOutcomeSummaryChecklist 12 09 16

QualityCourseOutcomeSummaryChecklist 12 09 16



Quality Course Outcome Summary Checklist REVISION IN PROGRESS





Quality Course Outcome Summary Checklist
Title of Course
Course Number
Division
Dean
Associate Dean
Person Creating/Editing
Curriculum Coach
External Standards

Yes __________

No__________

Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) In Place

Yes __________

No__________

Yes __________

No__________

Other programs that use this courses:
(check WIDS)
Transcripted Credit or Articulation Agreement

Directions
Use the Scoring Guide as a checklist to review and revise your curriculum project. The criteria on the scoring guide explain what
is expected for a completed curriculum project, whether it is new, revised, or updated.

Rating Scale
Value
Okay

Description
Information meets standards and is complete

Add

Information needs to be added

Revise

Information needs to be revised

NA

Not Applicable – the information is not required for the course

Scoring Guide
Course Information Tab
Please note: Items 1-8 below CANNOT be edited by faculty. All changes must be approved
by Curriculum Services and the Division Office before a change is officially made. Send an
email to curriculum services with any changes.

Ratings
Okay Add Revise NA

1. Course Information – Review for accuracy.
a. Course number, title, description and total credits must match Power Campus
b. Total hours - WTCS mandates lecture hours of 18 hours per credit. For example, a
3 credit class x 18 hrs = 54 hrs.
Revised 12-09-2016 Dryden

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

c. Instructional Type - Note that the majority of courses will be lecture – some will
have lab component as well
d. Instructional Level and Career Cluster – Note that this field is not required and can
be blank.
2.

Purpose/ Goals - This field is not required and can be left blank.

3. Pre/ Co-requisites - This list should be reviewed for accuracy. Email Curriculum

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

Services with any changes.

4. Textbooks
5. Bibliography - This field should not be used.
6. Learner Supplies
7. Guidelines - This field should not be used.
8. Custom Fields - This field is not required and is often blank.
Related Outcomes Tab

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Ratings

Core Abilities - Core Abilities are the key employability skills that employers expect of all graduates. The official
College Core Abilities are listed below. Please verify your list:
 Use effective communication skills.
 Apply mathematical concepts.
 Transfer social and natural science theories into practical applications.
 Demonstrate ability to think critically.
 Demonstrate ability to value self and work ethically with others in a diverse population.
 Use technology effectively.
 Make decisions that incorporate the importance of sustainability.
1. Each core ability is listed.
Okay Add Revise NA
2. Each core ability has a qualifier listed that explains at what level the core ability is
Okay Add Revise NA
addressed (introduced, reinforced, or assessed).
Program Outcomes – Program outcomes are established in conjunction with your program advisory committee and
are tied to student learning outcomes assessment.
Okay Add Revise NA
1. Program Outcomes match the list of outcomes designated for the program.
2. Only the outcomes relevant to the course are listed.
3. Program outcomes have a qualifier listed that explains at what level the program

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

outcome is addressed (introduced, reinforced, or assessed).
External Standards – Note: External standards can be requirements from accrediting or regulating bodies, or other
external stakeholders. This is not a required field and is often blank.
1. External Standards are present if necessary.

Revised 12-09-2016 Dryden

Okay Add Revise NA

Course Competencies Tab
Ratings
Course competencies are skills, behaviors, and attitudes that represent what students should be able to do at the end
of the course. These are measurable and observable.
Each competency should begin with a single action verb describing what the student will be able to do upon
successful completion of the course. Only one verb should be used per competency. Examples of well-written
competencies include:




Create a career development plan.
Use spreadsheet software.
Pitch a tent for camping.



Translate a paragraph of Spanish into English.
This is well-written because an action verb is used and the action can be measured when completed.

Examples of poorly written competencies:
 Understand classical music. This is not measurable or observable.
 Perform office functions. This is not clear and concise.
 Select hand tools and use them to punch, drill, and shape sheet metal. (multiple performances)
 Remember the key terms.
This is not well-written because “remember” is not an action verb that demonstrates observable
performance. The competency is enhanced by changing the verb “remember” to “use.”
1. All competencies are well-written in a clear and concise manner
Okay Add Revise NA
2. The number of competencies in the course is consistent with the following guidelines:
Okay Add Revise NA
One (1) credit hour = three (3) to six (6) competencies.
3. Each competency utilizes Bloom’s taxonomy verbs at the applying, analyzing,
evaluating, or creating level. The Domain and level are listed for each – for example:
Domain – Cognitive – Level - Analyzing
If using this document electronically, click on the words “Bloom’s taxonomy” to access
the full Bloom’s document.

Okay Add Revise NA

4. Competencies are free from ambiguous adjectives or adverbs such as effective, basic,
major, proper, clearly, correctly, appropriate, etc.
5. Each competency is assessed in at least Performance Assessment Task (PAT) in the
curriculum.
6. Where applicable, competencies in this course match competencies from WTCS
projects.
Performance Standards (blue tab to the right of “competencies”)

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Ratings

Performance Standards include Assessment Strategies and Performance Criteria. An Assessment strategy defines the
product or process students will complete to demonstrate mastery of the competency. Types of assessment
strategies could include a written product, self-assessment, research project, or demonstration. Periods are used at
the end of the criteria statement.
Example of an Assessment Strategy with Criteria:
Competency: Write a resume
Assessment Strategy = Written Product (the written resume)
Criteria = Performance will meet expectations when:
 you include contact information.
 you include education.
 you include work history.
 you include professional activities.
 you display correct grammar and spelling.
Revised 12-09-2016 Dryden

Example of poorly written Criteria for the same Assessment Strategy:
Competency: Write a resume.
Assessment Strategy = Written Product (the written resume)
Criteria = Performance will meet expectations when:
 your resume looks nice.
 you correctly includes all parts.
 you prepare a resume appropriately.
 you use clearly written words.
1. The assessment strategy defines the product or process the student will complete.
2. Criteria is aligned with the assessment strategy.
3. Criteria describe measurable and observable specifications to evaluate the
competency. Each criteria is a separate bullet point.
4. Criteria Lead-In from drop down menu is: “You will know you are successful when:”
5. Criteria begin with “you”. Do not capitalize “you” and use proper punctuation
including periods.
6. Criteria identify things such as characteristics of a satisfactory performance, accuracy,
tolerance, speed, percent, number of errors permitted, published standards, degree of
excellence, content/concepts to be addressed in the assessment task.
7. Criteria are free from ambiguous adjectives or adverbs (e.g. effective, basic, major,
proper, clearly, appropriate, correctly, etc.). REASON – It is difficult to measure
ambiguous adjectives and verbs. Students would then not be clear as to what the
expectations are. See above for criteria examples.

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

8. Criteria are not based on instructor judgment or dependent upon a textbook as a
reference.
9. All criteria are included in the scoring guides for assessment tasks.
Learning Objectives (Blue tab to the right of “performance standards”)

Okay Add Revise NA

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

Okay Add Revise NA

Okay Add Revise NA
Ratings

Learning objectives tell learners the supporting skills, knowledge and attitudes they will learn. Learning objectives
break down competencies to make them easier to teach. For example:
Competency: Interview for a job.
Learning Objective: Demonstrate strategies for introducing yourself.
1. Each competency includes at least two (2) learning objectives and not more than six
(6). If more are necessary, a second competency is recommended; or, the discipline
lends itself to more learning objectives (i.e. math).
2. Each learning objective begins with a single action verb using Bloom’s Taxonomy (do
not use multiple verbs).
3. Each learning objectives is written at the same or lower level of the competency in
Bloom's Taxonomy.

Okay Add Revise NA

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

4. Each learning objective tells the learner what he/she will learn.
Linked Core Abilities
Core abilities are linked to competencies.

Okay Add Revise NA
Okay Add Revise NA

Linked Program Outcomes
Program outcomes are linked to competencies.

Okay Add Revise NA

Revised 12-09-2016 Dryden