NFE learner centered communication 3-15-17

NFE learner centered communication 3-15-17



NFE learner centered communication 3-15-17







NEW FACULTY EXPERIENCE
March, 2017

FQA S C OMPETENC Y

#3: Demonstrate learner-centered communication.
• Contemplate what good student communication is through examples, case studies
and anecdotes.
• Discuss problems, solutions, and best practices relating to communication with and
between students.
• Identify new (to you) strategies to ensure a learner-centered approach to
communication, both in and outside of the classroom.

( D O A S I S AY A N D A S I D O ! )

EX PEC TATI ONS FOR C OMMU NI C ATI ON

• Facilitator sharing: expectations for your students and yourself
• How do you convey them?
• How do you police?

( S E E W H AT I S A I D T H E R E ? . . . )

VERBAL AN D N ON VERBAL
COM M UN ICATION
• What are Soft Skills?
• The US Dept of Labor has identified 6 Critical Soft Skills
• Communication
• Enthusiasm
• Teamwork
• Networking
• Problem Solving
• Professionalism

EM PL OYER’S PERSPECTIVE
S O U R C E : S E A T T L E J O B S I N I T I AT I V E

SEATTL E J OBS I NI TI ATI VE:
SU RVEY OF EMPL OYERS
• Employers rated specific soft skills in terms of importance to entry-level
positions
• 1: not necessary for entry level positions
• 2: somewhat beneficial
• 3: beneficial
• 4: very beneficial, but not mandatory
• 5: mandatory

SJ I : SU RVEY OF EMPL OYERS

SJ I : SU RVEY OF EMPL OYERS

SOFT SKIL L PROBL EM S SEEN BY
RACIN E COUN TY EM PL OYERS
* THE J O U RNA L TI ME S 1 / 6/ 2013

• Absenteeism
• Bad Attitude
• Cell phone use on the job
• Inappropriate language/remarks
• “Know-it-all syndrome”
• Lack of maturity

• No desire to work if they can collect
unemployment compensation
• Not adaptable to new situations
• Poor communication skills
• Substance abuse
• Tardiness
• Wanting to work only a certain shift

NON- VERBA L C OMMU NI C ATI ON

• Use of gestures, facial expressions and other inaudible
expressions to transmit a message
• May not transmit “your” message
• May not transmit “intended” message
• Can unintentionally send the wrong message inadvertently
• 7% of message is verbal, 38% tone and 55% nonverbal

FUNCTION OF NONVERBAL
COMMUNICATION
• Complements a message
• Repeats the message
• Contradict the message (sarcasm)
• Regulate a conversation
• Substitution
• Accents the message

TYPES OF NONVERBAL
COMMUNICATION
• Physical characteristics
• Not fair, but people stereotype
• Attractive, clean, well-groomed = +
• Clothing (clean, match job)
• Territoriality/ proxemics

•
•
•
•
•

Intimate distance 0”-18”
Personal space 18” to 4’(good friends)
Social distance 4’ to 12’ (causal friends)
Public distance 12’ to 25’
Don’t forget about Vertical Distance

TYPES OF NONVERBA L
C OMMU NI C ATI ON C ONT…
• Vocalics: “I didn’t say you were stupid.”
• Gestures (culturally influenced)
• What is in a hand shake
• Palm down, neutral or palm up?
• Posture
• Open postures
• Closed postures

TYPES OF C OMMU NI C ATI ON C ONT.

• Facial expression
• SADF(I)SH
• Sadness

Fear

• Anger

Interest (not as clear)

• Disgust

Surprise

Happiness

• Eye Contact (cultural influence)
• In America, more eye contact when listening
• Spanish- speaking cultures, looking down is a sign of respect

NONVERBA L C OMMU NI C ATI ON

• Expressive Communication
• Analogy = Broca’s Aphasia

• Receptive Communication
• Analogy = Wernicke’s Aphasia

( I ’ V E G O T O N E S I C K G R A N D PA ! )

WORD SEL EC TI ON A ND L A NGUAGE
• “It’s not IF you’re biased; it’s HOW you’re biased.” Dr. Eddie Moore, Diversity
Educator
• What are some biases that you know you have?
• Be aware of words you may use that may exclude groups. I work hard at not saying,
“guys” to my groups of students. Many times I use the word “gang.”
• I also deliberately say “partner” instead of wife, husband, girlfriend, boyfriend.
• I say “place of religious worship” or “church, synagogue, or mosque” instead of
“church.”
• I try and say “she and he” as often as I say “he and she.”

I NSPI RE STU D ENTS TO BE
BETTER PEOPL E
• You can affect people’s moral boundaries by the way you phrase things.
• Instead of saying, “Don’t be the creep who gets by in school by doing the bare
minimum,”
• Say “Be the person who goes the extra mile to learn all she can, and really
shine in the workplace!”
• Article – “How Word Choice Can Affect Our Moral Boundaries”:
https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/benoit-monin-how-word-choice-canaffect-moral-boundaries

( SI N G I T ARE THA! . . . R- E - S- P- E - C -T! )

G UIDEL IN ES FOR PRODUCTIVE DIAL OG UE
• Be aware of the tone of your response after listening
• Identify and note assumptions when made
• Active listening – “What I hear you saying is ____...”
• Observe reactions without singling out
• Silence can be golden… slow down the discussion (the Stacy Mitchell effect)
• Befriend polarization – recognize differing views
• Be open – you’re a guide, not a judge
• Model respect

( A C H A I N I S O NLY A S S T RO NG A S I T S W E A KE S T L I NK)

GROU P WORK A ND C OMMU NI C ATI ON

• Groups of 3 – each needs a facilitator, a secretary, and a reporter to speak for
the group.
• Discuss group work you have in one of your classes. What works? What
doesn’t? How do help make sure the dialogue is meaningful, and equitable?
How do you build report and camaraderie? Each member should try and give
at least one example. Choose one to share with the group. (10-15 mins)
• Facilitator examples – Ann, Jake and Scott
• Anything you found new and interesting?

BREAK TIME!

TOOL S A ND RESOU RC ES TO EX PL ORE
• Disclaimer : these came from various sources, not necessarily the facilitators.
We might not be able to answer specific questions about these apps/tools.

The usual suspects…

69% of all US Adults in 2016

About 1 in 3 accounts
have never tweeted

70% of users are Millennials

60% of users log in daily

HOOTSU I TE

• Founded in 2008
• Can post to multiple social media platforms from one place.
• Can schedule posts to happen in the future
• Pro version is $10/month, but a free account gives you access to up to 5 social
media profiles at one time.
• https://hootsuite.com/

REMI ND

• Founded in 2011
• A private mobile messaging platform
• Students use their phones to subscribe. Then you can send text messages
directly to their phones that don’t give them your number.
• It’s free, and according to Remind, is used in over 70% of public schools in the
US.
• https://www.remind.com/

POL L EVERYWHERE

• Founded in 2007
• A classroom and audience response system.
• You ask your students a question through the site, and students can respond
via text, with the results available in realtime.
• Free to start, with upgradable options.
• https://www.polleverywhere.com/

G O S OA P B OX

• Founded in 2011
• A realtime web based clicker tool used for in-class quizzes, polling and
discussion.
• Similar to Polleverywhere, but developed specifically for education.
• Free if fewer than 30 students in your class.
• http://www.gosoapbox.com/

SKYPE

• Founded in 2003
• A popular application that allows video chat/conferencing, instant messaging
and voice calling.
• Can use a smartphone or a computer with the application downloaded to it.
• Able to share the desktop environment (both parties) and send documents
during the “call”.
• Free, and even integrated into the most recent version of Microsoft Office
(accessible through a button on the tool bar at the top).
• Info and download – PC or Mac: https://www.skype.com/en/

KA HOOT

• Founded in 2013
• A game-based learning platform
• You create the game, where you can add images, videos and diagrams to your
questions (usually multiple choice). Players answer on their devices.
• Again, free. Students are encouraged to make their own games too.
• https://getkahoot.com/

PA D L ET

• Founded in 2008
• Web based “graffiti wall” to share with students.
• Good for brainstorming or encouraging students to share their ideas.
• 1 month free, then $5/month, or $45/year.
• https://padlet.com/

J I NG

• Founded in 2007
• Video capture application.
• From the makers of Camtasia, a quick and free way to do screen capture.
• Limited to 5 minutes of capture/video.
• https://www.techsmith.com/jing.html

C A SE STU DY
•

‘Pat’ is a student completing an internship at a small hospital

•

She is doing well in the rotation; everything appears to be going well

•

Apparently Pat is unhappy at the internship, as evident by the following Facebook posts:
•

“I die a little inside each day that I have to go to this clinical”

•

“Going to ______ hospital drains every ounce of my well-being”

•

“Everyone at ________ was mean to me yesterday”

•

The above comments were posted without Pat realizing that people at the facility may see them or that Pat’s
family/friends may be receiving services at the hospital

•

Pat is very polite and respectful in person, and provides great patient care. Did Pat violate any school policies
with her Facebook posts?

•

Does Pat pass the internship? Why or why not? If yes, then with what grade?

SOC I A L MED I A POL I C Y & “NETI QU ETTE”

• Health & Public Safety Social Media Policy
• Netiquette
• Cell Phone Policy?

C OMMU NI C ATI ON POL I C I ES A ND RU L ES

• NFE facilitators write on the whiteboards - Good communication should be
___________. (your suggestions)
• Now you write on the boards policies or rules they have relating to the proper
adjective.
• Take a moment to view what’s on the whiteboards… any
discoveries/questions?

( S O L O NG … FA R E W EL L… )

BEFORE YOU LEAVE
• Recall one thing that stuck with you through today’s session. Write it down.
• Find a partner. Talk to that person about your “sticky point”, and how it will
challenge you. Tell that person one thing you intend to try or do differently in
future classes.
• Consider scheduling a follow-up with that person to talk about how it went.

Thanks for your time!!!