2016 Fall Criminal Justice Data Summary

2016 Fall Criminal Justice Data Summary








Data and Evidence Analysis Summary – 2016
Criminal Justice – Law Enforcement
Conducted by Doreen Olson, Adjunct Faculty and Program Development Coordinator, 6-20-2016

WTCS Comparative Data:
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-10-5045-Criminal-JusticeLaw-Enforcement-QRP-Associate-Degree-Evidence-Analysis-Report.pdf
Course Completion
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Western’s C or Better for Criminal Justice – Law Enforcement program ranged from 62% (2011)
to 88.7% (2015). When compared to the other four colleges selected as a comparison group,
Western ranks 5th out of 5. Western’s average is 67% for the reporting years 2011-2015.
Lakeshore Technical College led all colleges with completion rate ranging from 78.1% (2013) to
83.1% (2015) with an average of 80%.
Western’s number of students dropped from 256 (2012) to 62 (2015). Lakeshore and
Northcentral Technical College noted a decline in student numbers form 2011-2015. Northeast
Technical College was the only school who experienced an increase of students numbers during
this time from 356 (2011) to 390 (2015).

Second Year Retention
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Western’s second year retention rate declined from 52.9% in 2011 to 33.8% in 2015.
When compared to the other four colleges, Western’s has the lowest second year retention
average over the six years of measurement (2011-2015). Western’s average is 43.9% which is
lower than three colleges whose averages are within the 60-67% range. Chippewa Valley’s
average of 74.3% is the highest of the five colleges with only four years reported, 2012-2015
versus six years of data.
Western has experienced decline of students from 155 (2011) to 77 (2015). The other
comparison colleges had fluctuating numbers during the six year reporting period. For example,
Northcentral Technical College had 55 students (2010), 104 in 2012, and a drop to 61 in 2014.
Chippewa Valley had 109 students in 2013 and 2014 with a decline in 2015 (96 students)

Western’s Third Year Graduation
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Western’s third year graduation rates have fluctuated from 19.7% in 2013 to 8.7% (2014) to
20.2% in 2015.
In comparison to the other four colleges, Western’s third-year graduation rate (average) of
16.9% is 5th out of five. Lakeshore Technical College’s average is the highest at 47.9% during the
2011-2015 reporting period. Chippewa Valley Technical College’s average appears to be the
highest at 59.6% but has three reporting years.

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Labor Market Analysis October 2015
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-OCT-Criminal-JusticeProgram-Trends.pdf
In an analysis of the Western District and occupations associated with the field of Criminal Justice – Law
Enforcement, the following points are noted:
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The data includes information from the following occupations: probation officers; correctional
treatment specialists; bailiffs; fish and game wardens; police and sheriff’s patrol officers’ private
detectives and investigators; gaming surveillance officers, and security guards.
From 2016-2020, these occupations are expected to grow 1.1%. This is a small growth rate for
our region.
The district growth rate is slightly lower than the state’s growth rate of 1.5%. The district rate is
-2.8% lower than the nation’s rate of 3.9%.
Jobs are well-distributed throughout the district with high concentrations in La Crosse County
(672). Monroe (267), Jackson (265) and Juneau (256) Counties also show good concentration
with a similar number of jobs in 2020.
This program appears to have a solid age distribution between the ages of 25-54. The
distribution is as follows: 22.6% 25-34 years; 22.6% 35-44 years; 22.7% 45-54 years. The 19-24
year-old population may be a target for recruitment with only 9.4% of occupations filled by that
age group in 2015.
An analysis of the district’s Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) shows that there are 2
educational programs tagged to deliver graduates into the field; Criminal Justice/Police Science
and Social Work. In 2014 there were 72 completions compared to 55 openings.
The majority of jobs in 2015 were housed within local/state/federal government for a total of
1,387 jobs in the industry. Investigation Services revealed 79 jobs in 2015.
Median hourly wages is $19.38 which is above the national average of $18.21.

Student Satisfaction Trends
The Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory was conducted in the fall of 2015. The instrument asks
students to rate the importance AND the satisfaction with 95 items (1-7 with 7 as highest) related to the
following “scales”:
 Instructional effectiveness
 Academic advising/counseling
 Concern for the individual
 Registration effectiveness
 Admissions and financial aid
 Student centeredness
 Campus climate
 Academic services
 Service excellence
 Safety and security
 Campus support services and responsiveness to diverse populations
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In the program self-study process (data and evidence analysis work), programs are asked to identify
gaps between importance and satisfaction. Gaps are calculated as the difference between the
importance of an item and the satisfaction level. Gaps that are close to a “1” should be discussed and
explored – particularly if they are tied to items that are rated as high in importance for students.
Ten students completed the survey. A cursory glance at the “scale” level reveals a gap in the safety and
security area (0.83). The overall satisfaction with the experience at Western for Criminal Justice – Law
Enforcement was 5.00 as compared to 5.68 for all students responding to the survey. Criminal Justice –
Law Enforcement students indicated that the experience thus far was better than expected (5.60),
whereas all students responding to this survey scored this at an average of 4.93.
A more detailed analysis was conducted at the “item” level. Items are associated with one or more
“scales” and provide additional insight into specific areas.
Items rated highest in importance for Criminal Justice – Law Enforcement students include (scale of 1-7
with 7 as very important):
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Item #3 – The quality of instruction in the vocational/technical programs is excellent 6.71
Item #5 – Personnel involved in registration are helpful. 6.78
Item #6 – My academic advisor is approachable. 7.00
Item #7 – Adequate financial aid. 6.88
Item #16 – College shows concern for students as individuals. 6.78
Item #17 – Personnel in Veteran’s Services program are helpful. 7.00
Item #18 – The quality of instruction I receive in most of my classes is excellent. 6.78
Item #21 – There are significant study areas on campus. 6.75
Item # 23 – Faculty are understanding of students’ unique life circumstances. 6.78
Item # 29 – Faculty are fair and unbiased in their treatment of individual students. 6.67
Item #35 – Policies and procedures regarding registration and course selection are clear. 6.78
Item #49 – Admission counselors respond to prospective students’ unique needs. 6.71
Item #51 – There are convenient ways of paying my school bill. 6.78
Item #52 – This school does whatever it can to help me reach my educational goals. 7.00
Item #66 – Program requirements are clear and reasonable. 6.78
Item #70 – I am able to experience intellectual growth here. 6.78
Item #78 – Help is readily available to students whose grades fall below average. 6.78
Item #80 – College communication makes me feel like I made a good choice. 6.89

Note that the students in this program seemed to associate a higher level of importance to many items
as compared to students in other programs. This resulted in several items with larger gaps between
importance and satisfaction. Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
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Item # 18 – The quality of instruction I receive in most of my classes is excellent. (1.18 gap)
Item # 23 – Faculty are understanding of students’ unique life circumstances. (1.08 gap)
Item #7 – Adequate financial aid is available. (1.21)
Item #65 – Students are notified early in the term if they are doing poorly in a class. (1.5 gap)
Item #5 – The personnel involved in registration are helpful. (1.08 gap)
Item #76 – The college helps me identify resources to finance my education. (1.17 gap)
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Item #67 – Channels for expressing student complaints are readily available. (1.18 gap)
Item # 56 – The business office is open during hours that are convenient for most. (1.18 gap)

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Trends
There were 29 responses to the assessment.
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By far the largest number of “dislikes” was the classes being taught in Sparta. Especially
classroom time when those could be anywhere and 90% of the students were from La Crosse
area. Also, students on meal plans couldn’t use their plan in Sparta.
Many students didn’t like that it was year round as it didn’t give them time to work over the
summer to accumulate funds to pay for their education.
Comments were made to make the program certifiable. Now that Academy is separate,
financial aid doesn’t cover it.

Graduate Follow-Up Trends
Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

2012-13
Police Chief
DNR Officer
Police Officer
Police Departments of New Albin ,IA; Viroqua, WI; Eleva/Osseo/Strum,
WI
WI DNR office, Trempealeau,WI
2013-14
Case Manager
Police Officer
Security Officer
Attic Correctional Services, La Crosse, WI
Galesville Police Dept, Galesville, WI
Westby Police Dept, Westby, WI
Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, WI
Trane, La Crosse, WI
2014-15
Asset Protection Associate
Campus Security Officer
Civil Service Employee
Police Officer
Sheriff’s Deputy/Jailer
Shopko, La Crosse, WI
St. Mary’s University, Winona, MN
City of La Crosse, La Crosse, WI
Monroe County, Sparta, WI
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Career Pathways Assessment
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Your program had five responses to the survey. Three were full-time faculty.
You also had two deans or associate deans complete.
Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
o There appears to be an opportunity to discuss student options such as Credit for Prior
Learning, articulation agreements with high school students or credit transfer options.
o There appears to be an opportunity to discuss faculty responsibilities in credit
agreements, collaboration with high school teachers to maintain college level standards,
and extending Credit for Prior Learning to incoming students.
o Another opportunity for discussion might be internal partnerships with Business and
Industry Services, scholarship options with the Western Foundation, or opportunities to
work with the Career Services Office.

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