2016 Fall Nursing Data Summary

2016 Fall Nursing Data Summary








Data and Evidence Analysis Summary – 2016
Nursing – Associate Degree
Conducted by Doreen Olson, Adjunct Faculty and Program Development Coordinator, 7-27-2016

WTCS Comparative Data:
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-10-5431-Nursing-QRPAssociate-Degree-Evidence-Analysis-Report.pdf
Course Completion
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Western’s C or Better for the Nursing program ranged from 72% (2012) to 77.3% (2014). When
compared to the other five colleges selected as a comparison group, Western ranks 6th out of
six. Western’s average is 74.5% for the reporting years 2011-2015. Chippewa Valley Technical
College consistently outranked Western and has the highest completion rate ranging from
89.6% (2015) to 92.5% (2011 & 2014) with an average of 91.5%. Northeast Wisconsin Technical
College ranks second with an average completion rate of 90.5% from 2011-2015.
Western’s number of students dropped from 790 (2011) to 648 (2014) then increased to 673 in
2015. Four of the five other colleges reported an increase of students during the 2011-2015
period. Northeast Wisconsin Technical College had the largest increase during this period. Their
numbers increased from 543 students to 893 students during the five year span. They
maintained their retention during this period of time and have an average of 90.5%

Second Year Retention
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Western’s second year retention rate ranged from 48.6% (2013) to 62.3% in 2015
When compared to the other five colleges, Western has the lowest second year retention
average over the six years of measurement (2011-2015). Western’s average is 55.5% which is
lower than Northeast Wisconsin Technical College’s average of 74%. Chippewa Valley’s average
of 88.4%. is the highest with only four years reported, 2012-2015.
Western has experienced a steady decline of students from 389 (2011) to 281 (2015). The other
comparison colleges had fluctuating numbers during the six year reporting period. For example,
Moraine Park Technical College had 406 students (2010) with a drop to 172 in 2011 with
increases in 2012 (306) and 2015 (328). This type of significant fluctuation has been noted at
Northeast Wisconsin, Lakeshore, and Northcentral Technical Colleges.

Western’s Third Year Graduation
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Western’s third year graduation rates have fluctuated from13.1% in 2011 to 6.6% (2014) to
11.4% in 2015.
In comparison to the other five colleges, Western’s third-year graduation rate (average) of 9.6%
is 6th out of six. Northeast Wisconsin Technical College’s average is 45.6% during the 2011-2015
reporting period. Chippewa Valley Technical College’s average is the highest at 73.2% but has
only three reporting years.

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Western’s data indicates 436 student enrolled in the program from 2011-2015 whereas
Chippewa Valley has 70 students and Northeast Wisconsin 217 students during this same time
period. Northeast Wisconsin showed an increase from 46 students in 2014 to 81 students in
2015.

Labor Market Analysis October 2015
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-OCT-Nursing-ProgramTrends.pdf
In an analysis of the Western District and occupations associated with the field of Nursing – Associate
Degree the following points are noted:
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The nursing occupation is expected to grow in the Western district by 7.7% as compared to a
national growth rate of 6.5%. This results in the addition of 391 jobs to this career pathway from
2016-2020. This is considered very strong growth pattern.
District trends are anticipated to be higher than the state trend of 6.3%.
Nursing jobs are projected to have the highest concentration in La Crosse County (4,003 jobs) in
2020. Monroe County follows with a projection of 457 jobs.
This program has an aging population within its employment. 27.9% of those employed are 55
years of age or older and 28.3% are in the 45-54 age range. A small segment of workers (2.9%) is
in the 19-24 year old population. The high school population of students may benefit from
greater exposure to the occupations and benefits of working in the nursing field.
An analysis of the district’s Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) shows that there are
five educational programs tagged to deliver graduates into the field. The data indicates there
were 224 completers for 194 openings in 2014. This may be considered oversaturation of the
profession. The program must take into consideration the aging population of nursing who may
be retiring or moving to part-time positions to best right size the program.
The majority of jobs in 2015 were housed within general medical and surgical hospitals (74.8%).
This was followed by positions located in offices of physicians (6.0%).
Earnings for graduates of this program range from $22.95 per hour to $29.83 per hour with the
median hourly wage of $26.08. This is below the national median wage of $32.04.

Student Satisfaction Trends
The Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory was conducted in the fall of 2015. The instrument asks
students to rate the importance AND the satisfaction with 95 items (1-7 with 7 as highest) related to the
following “scales”:
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Instructional effectiveness
Academic advising/counseling
Concern for the individual
Registration effectiveness
Admissions and financial aid
Student centeredness
Campus climate
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Academic services
Service excellence
Safety and security
Campus support services and responsiveness to diverse populations

In the program self-study process (data and evidence analysis work), programs are asked to identify
gaps between importance and satisfaction. Gaps are calculated as the difference between the
importance of an item and the satisfaction level. Gaps that are close to a “1” should be discussed and
explored – particularly if they are tied to items that are rated as high in importance for students.
Fifty five students completed the survey. A cursory glance at the “scale” level reveals a gaps in: the
safety and security (1.13). The overall satisfaction with the experience at Western for Nursing –
Associate Degree program was 5.58 as compared to 5.68 for all students responding to the survey. The
Nursing students indicated that the experience thus far was lower than expected (4.56), whereas all
students responding to this survey scored this at an average of 4.93.
A more detailed analysis was conducted at the “item” level. Items are associated with one or more
“scales” and provide additional insight into specific areas.
Items rated highest in importance for Nursing students include (scale of 1-7 with 7 as very important):
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Item #18 – Quality of instruction I receive in most of my classes is excellent. 6.71

Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
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Item #7 – Adequate financial aid is available. (1.14)
Item #8 – Classes are scheduled at times that are convenient for me. (1.05)
Item #13 – Financial aid awards are announced in time for college planning. (1.19)
Item #18 – Quality of instruction I receive in most of my classes is excellent. (1.08)
Item #23 – Faculty are understanding of students’ unique life circumstances (1.21)
Item #37 – Faculty take into consideration student differences as they teach a course. (1.11)
Item #39 – Student parking space on campus is adequate. (2.61)
Item #52 – This school does whatever it can to help me reach my educational goals. (1.08)
Item #76 – College helps me identify resources to finance my education. (1.06)
Item #78 – Help is readily available to students whose grades fall below average. (1.04)

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Trends
There were 46 responses to this survey.
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Students liked the variety of the clinical rotation schedule.

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Many felt the continuous track of the program and finishing the program quickly was beneficial.

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Conclusion comments were positive regarding the student’s experience in the program.

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Students felt Blackboard was confusing and unorganized. Complained that assignments and
other important information wasn’t consistently posted in the same area and therefore got
missed.

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Some felt the driving distance for clinicals was too long (over and hour).
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Many students did not like the online format.

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Regarding technology, students wanted more experience on the actual equipment used in
practice (IV pumps, medication pumps, etc.)

Graduate Follow-Up Trends
Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

2012-13
Assistant Director of Nursing
LPN
Med-Surg RN
Nurse
RN Supervisor
RN
Golden Living Center, Rochester, MN
ResCare Homecare, Onalaska, WI
Vernon Memorial Healthcare, Viroqua, WI
Onalaska Care Center, Onalaska, WI
Bethany St. Joseph Care Center, La Crosse, WI
Accurate Homecare, Burnsville, MN
Baptist Health Systems, San Antonio, TX
Benedictine Health System, La Crosse, WI
Bethany Riverside, La Crosse, WI
Bethel Home and Services, Viroqua, WI
Black River Memorial Hospital, Black River Falls, WI
Caledonia Care Rehab, Caledonia, MN
Close to Home Assisted Living, Tomah, WI
Dove Healthcare South, Eau Claire, WI
Good Samaritan Society, Waukon, IA
Grand View Care Center, Blair, WI
Gundersen Health System, St. Joseph’s, Hillsboro, WI
Gundersen Health System, La Crosse / Onalaska, WI
Hillview Health Care Center, La Crosse, WI
Lakeview Health Center, West Salem, WI
Mayo Clinic Health System, La Crosse, WI/Onalaska, WI/Rochester, MN
Mulder Health Care, West Salem, WI
Onalaska Care Center, Onalaska, WI
Pine View Care Center, Black River Falls, WI
Prairie du Chien Memorial Hospital, Prairie du Chien, WI
Recover Health, La Crosse, WI
St. John Medical Center, Tulsa, OK
Tomah Memorial Hospital, Tomah, WI
Tomah VA Medical Center, Tomah, WI
Vernon Memorial Healthcare, Viroqua, WI
Western Wisconsin Cares, La Crosse, WI
Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare St. Francis Hospital, Milwaukee, WI
Winona Health, Winona, MN

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Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

2013-14
Assistant Director, RN
Charge RN/Wound Nurse
Nurse
RN
RN Pod Lead
Milestone Senior Living, Hillsboro, WI
Morrow Home Community, Sparta, WI
Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, WI
Mile Bluff Medical Center, Mauston, WI
Benedictine Manor, La Crosse, WI
Bethany Lutheran Homes, La Crosse, WI
Bethany St. Joseph Care Center, La Crosse, WI
Black River Correctional Center, Black River Falls, WI
Black River Memorial Hospital, Black River Falls, WI
Crest View Nursing Home, New Lisbon, WI
Lakeview Health Center, West Salem, WI
Mayo Clinic Health System, La Crosse, WI
Norseland Nursing Home, Westby, WI
Pine View Care Center, Black River Falls, WI
Tomah Memorial Hospital, Tomah, WI
Tomah VA Medical Center, Tomah, WI
Tri-County Memorial Hospital, Whitehall, WI
Vernon Memorial Healthcare, Viroqua, WI
Western WI Cares, La Crosse, WI
2014-15
LPN
Nursing Assistant
RN
Morrow Home Community, Sparta, WI
Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, WI
Advanced Pain Management, Madison, WI
Benedictine Living Community, La Crosse, WI
Bethany Lutheran Homes, La Crosse, WI
Black River Memorial Hospital, Black River Falls, WI
Chosen Valley Care Center, Chatfield, MN
Fairview Health Services, Minneapolis, MN
Hillview Health Care, La Crosse, WI
Mayo Clinic Health System, La Crosse, WI
Mile Bluff Medical Center, Mauston, WI
Mulder Health Care Facility, West Salem, WI
Nancy Long Henry, Greensburg, WI
Norseland Nursing Home, Westby, WI
Onalaska Care Center, Onalaska, WI
Reedsburg Area Medical Center, Reedsburg, WI
Richland Hospital Inc., Richland Center, WI
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St. Mary’s Hospital, Rochester, MN
Sumner Regional Medical Center, Wellington, KS
Tomah Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tomah, WI
Vernon Memorial Healthcare, Viroqua, WI
Wellington Place, Decorah, IA
Western Wisconsin Cares, La Crosse, WI
WI Dept of Corrections-New Lisbon Correctional Institute, New Lisbon,
WI

Career Pathways Assessment
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Your program had 20 responses to the survey. Sixteen were full-time faculty, one was adjunct
faculty and one response was other faculty.
You also had two deans or associate deans complete.
Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
o There appears to be some disagreement around the course sequencing area so this
might be a possible discussion area. Topics such as embedded and laddering
credentials, multiple entry and reentry points, and flexible delivery formats are included
in this area.
o Another area of possible discussion would be student options as there seems to be
several “unknown” responses as well as areas of disagreement. This includes Business
and Industry Services course work for program credit, transfer options for students, and
articulation agreements with area high schools.
o There appears to be an opportunity to discuss faculty responsibilities in credit
agreements, collaboration with high school teachers to maintain college level standards,
and extending Credit for Prior Learning to incoming students.
o Another opportunity for discussion might be internal partnerships with Business and
Industry Services, scholarship options with the Western Foundation, or opportunities to
work with the Career Services Office as there seems to be some disagreement and
“unknown” responses in this area.
o Other areas with many “unknown” responses that you may want to discuss include:
 External partnerships
 Advisory committee representation
 Advisory committee responsibilities
 Adjunct faculty
 Learning opportunities
o Lastly, there seems to be some disagreement in the area of proactive advising. This area
includes discussion of prep, waitlisted and program enrolled student engagement with
fulltime faculty, identifying student target audiences for planning, promoting and
recruiting, and having a process in place to assist students who are not exhibiting
program readiness skills.

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