2016 Fall Occupational Therapy Assistant Data Summary

2016 Fall Occupational Therapy Assistant Data Summary








Data and Evidence Analysis Summary – 2016
Occupational Therapy Assistant
Conducted by Doreen Olson, Adjunct Faculty and Program Development Coordinator, 7-27-2016

WTCS Comparative Data:
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-10-514-1-OccupationalTherapy-Assistant-QRP-Evidence-Analysis-Report.pdf
Course Completion
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Western’s C or Better for Occupational Therapy Assistant program ranged from 72.0% (2013) to
88.9% (2015). When compared to the other four colleges selected as a comparison group,
Western ranks 5th out of five. Western’s average is 82.4% for the reporting years 2011-2015.
Madison College, Fox Valley and Milwaukee Area Technical College all had three or more years
with completion at or over 90%. Madison College’s college success of completion has been
above 89.4% for each of the 2011-2015 reporting years and has an average of 91.6%.
Western number of students has varied within 20 students during the 2011-2015 timespan. In
2012 the program had 86 students. By 2015, the OTA program increased to 108 students. Fox
Valley Technical College has the highest enrollment of 289 (2011) and 327 (2012). Fox Valley
enrollment decreased to 235 by 2015. Madison College and Wisconsin Indianhead Technical
college enrollment has fluctuated by 19 and 20 students during this five year time span (20112015).

Second Year Retention
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Western’s second year retention rate ranged from 44% (2014) to 67.5% in 2013.
When compared to the other five colleges, Western’s is 4th out of five for second year retention
average over the six years of measurement (2011-2015). Western’s average is 59.7% which is
lower than Milwaukee Area Technical College average of 79.2% and Madison College’s average
of 79.3%.
Western had 30 students in 2010. Increased student numbers occurred in 2011 (59) and 2015
(56).

Western’s Third Year Graduation
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Western’s third year graduation rates range from 20% (2015) to 30% in 2014.
In comparison to the other four colleges, Western’s third-year graduation rate (average) of
25.8% is 4th out of five. Madison College’s average is 57.9% and Milwaukee Area Technical
College’s average is 53.8%.
Western’s data indicates 234 students enrolled in the program during the 2011-2015 reporting
years. Madison College indicates 129 students and Milwaukee Area Technical College indicates
145 students. Both of these colleges have third year graduation rates above 50%.

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Labor Market Analysis October 2015
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-OCT-Occupational-TherapyAssistant-Program-Trends.pdf
In an analysis of the Western District and occupations associated with the field of Occupational Therapy
Assistant, the following points are noted:
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From 2016-2020, this occupation is expected to grow 8.2% in the Western district compared to
a national growth of 12.9%. District trends are anticipated to be less than the state trend of
10.7%.
Job distribution in the district by the year 2020 indicates a high concentration in La Crosse
County (62 jobs). Surrounding counties have positions which are less than 10. Data includes
positons for occupational therapy assistants and occupational therapy aides.
This program’s employment pattern has a solid age distribution of individuals which is
represented in each age group. The 25-34 age group leads the employment field with 32.9%.
The 35-44 and 45-54 age groups both indicate 23% for 2015 jobs. The 55-64 and above
represents 14% of the employees. The smallest segment of workers is the 19-24 year old
population with 7.0%. The high school population of students may benefit from greater
exposure to the occupation and benefits of working in this health related field.
The majority of jobs in 2015 were housed within general medical and surgical hospitals (29.7%)
Following close behind are positions within the offices of physical, occupational, and speech
therapists at 27.1%. Jobs in nursing care facilities rank at 23.3% whereas positions in
elementary and secondary schools drop to 4.5%.
An analysis of the district’s Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) shows that there are
two educational programs tagged to deliver graduates into the field, Occupational Therapy
Assistant and Rehabilitation Aide. In 2014, there were 13 completers for three openings. At a
cursory glance, it appears that the field is oversaturated with graduates. In review of the 201314 graduate summary, 12 graduates obtained 10 positons in the field within six months of
graduation. It would be beneficial for the program to do a deeper analysis of the employment
rates.
Earnings for graduates of this program range from $19.36 per hour to $24.93 per hour with the
median hourly wage of $21.84. This is below the national median wage of $24.13. The
reported wage may actually be higher if the occupational therapy aide wages were not
calculated in with the occupational therapy assistant hourly wage.

Student Satisfaction Trends
The Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory was conducted in the fall of 2015. The instrument asks
students to rate the importance AND the satisfaction with 95 items (1-7 with 7 as highest) related to the
following “scales”:
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Instructional effectiveness
Academic advising/counseling
Concern for the individual
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Registration effectiveness
Admissions and financial aid
Student centeredness
Campus climate
Academic services
Service excellence
Safety and security
Campus support services and responsiveness to diverse populations

In the program self-study process (data and evidence analysis work), programs are asked to identify
gaps between importance and satisfaction. Gaps are calculated as the difference between the
importance of an item and the satisfaction level. Gaps that are close to a “1” should be discussed and
explored – particularly if they are tied to items that are rated as high in importance for students.
Thirteen students completed the survey. A cursory glance at the “scale” level reveals a gap in safety and
security (1.46). The overall satisfaction with the experience at Western for Occupational Therapy
Assistant program was 6.00 as compared to 5.68 for all students responding to the survey. The
Occupational Therapy Assistant students indicated that the experience thus far was lower than expected
(4.92), whereas all students responding to this survey scored this at an average of 4.93.
A more detailed analysis was conducted at the “item” level. Items are associated with one or more
“scales” and provide additional insight into specific areas.
Items rated highest in importance for Occupational Therapy Assistant students include (scale of 1-7 with
7 as very important):
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Item #18 – Quality of instruction I receive in most of my classes is excellent. 6.69
Item #31 – Campus is safe and secure. 6.77
Item #32 – My academic advisor is knowledgeable about program requirements. 6.75
Item #58 – Nearly all of the faculty are knowledgeable in their fields. 6.83

Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
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Item #10 – Child care facilities are available on campus. (1.27)
Item #11 – Security staff respond quickly in emergencies. (1.90)
Item #13 – Financial aid awards are announced in time for college planning. (1.62)
Item #17 – Personnel in the Veteran’s Services program are helpful. (2.87)
Item #19 – Campus provides effective support services for displaced homemakers. (1.42)
Item #24 – Parking lots are well-lighted and secure. (1.56)
Item #30 – Career services office provides students with help. (1.75)
Item #39 – Student parking space on campus is adequate. (2.87)
Item #72 – The Wellness Center meets my fitness needs. (1.33)
Item #79 – Effective support services are available for minority students. (1.17)

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Trends
There were 13 responses to this survey.
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Many comments on how students felt prepared after the program because of the field work,
scope of courses, and high standards and expectations from the instructors.

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Changes suggested were to even out the course load as it was quite heavy at times.

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One recommendation was to schedule meetings once a month with advisor/counselor to ensure
constructive feedback.

Graduate Follow-Up Trends
Year
Types of jobs obtained

Companies hiring Western
graduates

Year
Types of jobs obtained
Companies hiring Western
graduates

Year
Types of jobs obtained
Companies hiring Western
graduates

2012-13
Certified OTA
OTA
Skills Enrichment Assistant
Aegis Therapies, Marshfield, WI
Genesis Rehabilitation, Superior WI
Magnum Care, (?)
MVP,(?)
Saint Anne of Winona, Winona, MN
Therapies Plus, Wisconsin Rapids, WI
Vernon Memorial Healthcare, Viroqua, WI
Champion Rehab, Sartell, MN
Lake Winona Manor Nursing Home, Winona, MN
VARC, Inc., Viroqua, WI
2013-14
Certified Occupational Therapist Assistant
Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant
Aegis Therapies, Rochester, MN
Genesis Rehabilitation, Black River Falls, WI
Heritage Manor, Elroy, WI
Reedsburg, WI
Mayo Clinic Health System, La Crosse, WI
Millennium Therapy, Dubuque, IA
Therapies Plus, LLC, Wisconsin Rapids, WI
2014-15
Certified OTA
Occupational Therapy Assistant
Aegis Therapy, Mabel, MN
Grant Regional Health Center, Lancaster, WI
Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, WI
Therapies Plus, LLC, Wisconsin Rapids, WI
Wheels on the Bus Pediatric Therapy, Inc., Phoenix, AZ
Therapy Network, Inc., Winona, MN

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Career Pathways Assessment
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Your program had five responses to the survey. Two were full-time faculty and one was adjunct
faculty.
You also had one dean or associate dean complete.
Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
o There appears to be disagreement around the course sequencing area so this might be a
possible discussion area. Topics such as embedded and laddering credentials, multiple
entry points and reentry points, and flexible delivery formats are included in this area.
o There appears to be an opportunity to discuss student options that include Credit for
Prior Learning, articulation agreements with high schools and transfer options for
students.
o There appears to be an opportunity to discuss faculty responsibilities in credit
agreements, collaboration with high school teachers to maintain college level standards,
and extending Credit for Prior Learning to incoming students.
o Another opportunity for discussion might be internal partnerships with Business and
Industry Services, scholarship options with the Western Foundation, or opportunities to
work with the Career Services Office.
o Lastly, there seems to be some unknowns in the area of adjunct faculty. This might be
an area of discussion. Topics include use of technology to facilitate student learning,
employment of diverse or varied instructional strategies, communicating clear
classroom expectations, and employing instructional strategies that encourage skill and
knowledge development.

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