2016 Fall Paramedic Technician Data Summary

2016 Fall Paramedic Technician Data Summary








Data and Evidence Analysis Summary – 2016
EMT/Paramedic Technician
Conducted by Doreen Olson, Adjunct Faculty and Program Development Coordinator, 7-27-2016

WTCS Comparative Data:
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-10-5311-ParamedicTechnician-QRP-Associate-Degree-Evidence-Analysis-Report.pdf
Course Completion
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Western’s C or Better for the Paramedic program ranged from 67.5% (2012) to 90.6% (2014).
When compared to the other four colleges selected as a comparison group, Western ranked 5th
out of five. Western’s average is 73.7% for the reporting years 2011-2015. Northcentral
Technical College has a completion rate of average of 88.1%.
Western’s number of students was within an eight student fluctuation range during the fiveyear span. Northcentral experienced a significant decrease in students with 103 in 2011 and 27
in 2015.

Second Year Retention
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Western’s second year retention rate ranged from 25% (2014) to 50% in 2010 and 2012.
Western’s has the lowest second year retention average over the six years of measurement
(2011-2015). Western’s average of 36.78% is slightly lower than Lakeshore and Moraine Park
Technical Colleges but has consistent low rates similar to these two colleges. Northcentral
Technical College noted high retention percentages when their enrollment was high (90% in
2010, 87.3% in 2011). A significant decrease in retention was noted in 2014 (48.1%) and 2015
(20%).

Western’s Third Year Graduation
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Western’s third year graduation rates have been under 10.7% during the five year reporting
period (2011-2015).
Western’s third-year graduation rate (average) of 7% ranks 5th out of five colleges. In 2014,
Western report 0 third-year graduates. The overall college average for all five colleges is 16.6%.

Labor Market Analysis October 2015
https://facultyresources.westerntc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/2015-OCT-Paramedic-TechnicianProgram-Trends.pdf
In an analysis of the Western District and occupations associated with the field of EMT/Paramedic
Technician, the following points are noted:

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From 2016-2020, this occupation is expected to grow 1.3% in the Western district compared to
a national growth of 8.0%. The district trend is anticipated to be less than the state trend of
2.7% by the year 2020.
Job distribution in the district by the year 2020 indicates a high concentration in La Crosse
County (112 jobs). Surrounding counties have positions approximately half of the job projection
in La Crosse. Jackson and Monroe counties estimation is 58 and 55 jobs respectfully. Data
includes the SOC code positions for EMT and Paramedics.
This program’s employment pattern has a bell shape distribution of individuals of the age
groups. The 25-34 age group leads the employment field with 32.5% with the 35-44 age group at
26.9%. A decrease is noted in the 45-54 age group of 17.5% and the 19-24 age group at 12.9%.
The majority of jobs in 2015 were employed by local government which excluded education and
hospitals (54.9%). Ambulance services (21.1%) and general medical/surgical hospitals (18.6%)
ranked second and third in job projection.
An analysis of the district’s Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) shows that there is one
educational program tagged to deliver graduates into the field. In 2014, there were 64
completers for 12 openings. At a cursory glance, it appears that the field is oversaturated with
graduates. It would be beneficial for the program to do a deeper analysis of the employment
rates within the district.
Earnings for graduates of this program range from $12.16 per hour to $17.25 per hour with the
median hourly wage of $14.64. This is below the national median wage of $15.14.

Student Satisfaction Trends
The Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory was conducted in the fall of 2015. The instrument asks
students to rate the importance AND the satisfaction with 95 items (1-7 with 7 as highest) related to the
following “scales”:
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Instructional effectiveness
Academic advising/counseling
Concern for the individual
Registration effectiveness
Admissions and financial aid
Student centeredness
Campus climate
Academic services
Service excellence
Safety and security
Campus support services and responsiveness to diverse populations

In the program self-study process (data and evidence analysis work), programs are asked to identify
gaps between importance and satisfaction. Gaps are calculated as the difference between the
importance of an item and the satisfaction level. Gaps that are close to a “1” should be discussed and
explored – particularly if they are tied to items that are rated as high in importance for students.

This survey had four students respond. A cursory glance at the “scale” level did not reveal any gaps in in
the various categories of the survey. The overall satisfaction with the experience at Western for the
Paramedic Technician program was 5.75 as compared to 5.68 for all students responding to the survey.
The Paramedic Technician students indicated that the experience thus far was lower than expected
(4.75), whereas all students responding to this survey scored this at an average of 4.93.
A more detailed analysis was conducted at the “item” level. Items are associated with one or more
“scales” and provide additional insight into specific areas.
Items rated highest in importance for Paramedic Technician students include several items that scored
a 7 (scale of 1-7 with 7 as very important):
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Item #11 – Security staff respond quickly in emergencies. 7.00
Item #58 – Nearly all of the faculty are knowledgeable in their fields. 7.00

Note that the students in this program seemed to associate a higher level of importance to many items
as compared to students in other programs. The survey indicated 31 items with an importance level of
6.50 and above. There were 17 items that there was a 0 or higher (indicated with a – sign) between
importance and satisfaction. This indicates the students are satisfied with the education and services at
Western. Items that indicated gaps of 1.00 and above may be topics of discussion for this program
include:
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Item #4 – Security staff are helpful (1.00)
Item #11 – Security staff respond quickly in emergencies. (1.50)
Item #14 – Library resources and services are adequate. (1.50)
Item #38 – Student center is a comfortable place for students. (1.34)
Item #39 – Student parking space on campus is adequate. (1.84)
Item #45 – Western has a good reputation within the community. (1.42)
Item #46 – Faculty provide timely feedback about student progress in a course. (1.42)
Item #49 – Admissions counselors respond to prospective students’ needs and requests. (1.33)
Item #60 – Billing policies are reasonable. (1.00)
Item #63 – I seldom get the “run-around” when seeking information. (1.33)
Item #64 – Nearly all classes deal with practical experiences and applications. (1.17)
Item #65 – Students are notified early in the term if they are doing poorly. (1.67)
Item #78 – Help is readily available to students whose grades fall below average. (1.34)

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Trends
Graduate Follow-Up Trends
Year
Types of jobs obtained
Companies hiring Western
graduates

2012-13
Paramedic
Tri-State Ambulance, La Crosse, WI

Year
Types of jobs obtained
Companies hiring Western
graduates

2013-14 (no data)

Year
Types of jobs obtained
Companies hiring Western
graduates

2014-15
Paramedic
Life Care Ambulance Services, ?

Career Pathways Assessment
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Your program had five responses to the survey. Three were full-time faculty.
You also had two deans or associate deans complete.
Items that may be topics of discussion for this program include:
o There appears to be some disagreement around the course sequencing area so this
might be a possible discussion area. Topics such as embedded and laddering
credentials, multiple entry points and reentry points, and flexible delivery formats are
included in this area.
o Another area of possible discussion would be student options as there seems to be
several “unknown” responses. This includes Business and Industry Services course work
for program credit, transfer options for students, and articulation agreements with area
high schools.
o There appears to be an opportunity to discuss faculty responsibilities in credit
agreements, collaboration with high school teachers to maintain college level standards,
and extending Credit for Prior Learning to incoming students.
o Another opportunity for discussion might be internal partnerships with Business and
Industry Services, scholarship options with the Western Foundation, or opportunities to
work with the Career Services Office as there seems to be some disagreement and
“unknown” responses in this area.