Universal Design

Universal Design








Principles of Universal Design
Universal design is the design of products and environments to be usable by all
people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or
specialized design.

Universal Design for Learning is a set of principles for curriculum development
that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for
creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for
everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can
be customized and adjusted for individual needs.
Good for all students: General instructional strategies based on the principles of
Universal Design for instruction.
Syllabus
 define essential components of the class
 clearly written class expectations
 your contact information
 grading scale
 disability accommodation statement
 attendance, tardiness, participation, and late work policies
Consistency
 organize class and give simple directions in predictable format
 follow routine
 post daily agenda
 be consistent with expectations and due dates
Technology
 use technology to enhance instruction and increase accessibility
 provide all text and handouts in electronic format
 post oral directions in written/electronic format
 design handouts and slides so user can easily change
font/spacing/color/size/background or remove graphics that may be
distracting
Summarize information
 at end of major topic, summarize main ideas
 arrange information consistent with its importance, distinguish "essential to
know" information from "nice to know" information
Created/Adapted by Kristina Stellpflug

12.11.14

1

Assignments/Projects/Tests/Quizzes
 provide effective prompting and feedback during and after task completion
 use grading rubric
 use varied testing format
 consider designing tests to cover smaller rather than larger amounts of
information
 consider breaking longer more complex assignments into smaller segments
 allow for a variety of ways students demonstrate knowledge; allow them to
express themselves in a manner that is consistent with the way they learn
 clearly state rules for homework, including homework due dates
Learning Style
 use different modes (pictorial, verbal, hands-on) when presenting information
 design classroom activities that allow for movement, discussion, questions,
demonstration, and/or group work
 use circular seating
 reduce distraction noises
 allow time for formulating questions or responses
 change activities; mix fine motor and gross motor skills
References/Resources:
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl
http://accessproject.colostate.edu/udl/
http://mywtcs.wtcsystem.edu/instruction-student-services/student-supportservices/disability-services

Created/Adapted by Kristina Stellpflug

12.11.14

1